Temple Grandin's Hug Machine


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The author (an autistic person) developed a device that delivers deep touch pressure to help her learn to tolerate touching and to reduce anxiety and nervousness.
Temple Grandin
A series of clinical trials were conducted at a day school at the Michael Reese Hospital & Medical Center in Chicago to evaluate students' use of the hug machine. Researchers wanted to know if students would actually make use of this equipment on a consistent basis. Students who used the lateral pressure equipment showed a significant improvement in behavior and the ability to perform school-related activities.
Ivanhoe Broadcast News
A series of clinical trials were conducted at a day school at the Michael Reese Hospital & Medical Center in Chicago to evaluate students' use of the hug machine. Researchers wanted to know if students would actually make use of this equipment on a consistent basis. Students who used the lateral pressure equipment showed a significant improvement in behavior and the ability to perform school-related activities.
Students with autism experience cycles of stress and changes in behavior as do other individuals with developmental disabilities. Students using the lateral pressure equipment showed a significant increase in total adaptive movements and competence
Margaret Creedon
In a school setting, access and scheduling issues resulted in some practical limits. Nonetheless, the Squeeze Machine is a significant option for some students' use.
Margaret Creedon
Made of two padded side-boards hinged near the bottom to form a V-shape. The user lies down or squats inside the V. By using a lever, the user engages an air cylinder, which pushes the side-boards together, providing deep-pressure stimulation.
Steven Edelson
At the present time, several programs around the country have utilized Temple's 'Hug Boxes' and have observed similar changes in children and adults with autism, particularly a general calming effect.
Stephen Edelson

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